Lighting with V-Ray for SketchUp – definitive guide part 2

adobe flash professional cs6
Autodesk AutoCAD 2020
Softonic review By Editorial Team V-Ray is 3D model rendering software, usable with many different modelling programs but particularly compatible with SketchUp, Maya, Blender and others for which it has a specialized version. The software is frequently updated with under the hood features that allow it to take advantage of the latest CPUs and GPUs. Interfacing With The 3D World V-Ray was in use more than a decade ago as of this writing, making it an extremely mature application that’s compatible with just about anything. Unfortunately, it also shows its age a bit in the interface which, despite streamlining in recent versions, is still dull, with lots of large and sometimes disorganized square panes full of small text. On the other hand, the program is very stable, never crashing in our testing, and some of its tools have clearly been perfected over the years to maximize usability:
vray 2 for sketchup

How to reduce noise in render vray sketchup

Part 1 in this series can be found here. Nomer continues his great collection of lighting tutorials to help you get to grips with and simplify this often complex process, with some easy solutions to this often frustrating and confusing aspect to rendering.

In this guide Nomer checks out Emissve materials to help light your SketchUp models. You will need a reasonable knowledge of SketchUp, rendering and the use of Photoshop for this tutorial.

What is Emissive Material? Emissive Material is actually a special material layer of V-Ray for SketchUp used for producing self-illuminated surfaces. It also allows a plane, a face or an object applied with this material to turn into an actual light source.

The reason was blotchiness…. Can I possibly produce quality rendering just by using Emissive lighting? In this 2nd Part of my tutorial, I will try my best to share my knowledge and my experience in using Emissive material. But before that, let me reintroduce the basic function of it and how you can access this in V-Ray for SketchUp. I will be using this simple scene to show you how to access this material easily. Again, just like my part 1 tutorial in this series, the Camera and Physical Sky are turned off.

This means I will be relying totally on Emissive materials to light up my scene. SketchUp Scene 2. Accessing the V-Ray Light material This one is pretty simple. Open the V-Ray Material Editor.

Click the Emissive Layer then and place it on your material stacks. See the image below for reference. Check Double-Sided, which means both negative and positive faces will have an Emissive Layer. I basically increase the HSph Subdivs of my Irradiance map. HDRI will be tackled later in the this series of tutorials. The next render shows a slight reflection thus creating a much more believable surface. I also added a material to the studio surface. Reflection Layer 4. Using Bitmap as Emissive lighting Bitmaps can also be added and create emissive lighting by using them.

This is very easy to achieve in V-Ray for SketchUp. Once you have created an Emissive Map Layer, you can actually load a bitmap. This bitmap will then be used as self emitting material. This is useful for TV screens, fire, glowing backgrounds and candle light material. Bitmaps Below is a simple scene that I will use to demonstrate how to place a TV screen map and how to create fire to effectively light my fireplace.

Again this is very easy to achieve in Google SketchUp. Bear in mind that any UV tiling with bump, displacement, dirt, transparency etc. This time instead of using Emissive Color, we will load the same Diffuse map on to the Emissive Layer. The Intensity will control the power of this map. See image below. Intensity 1. I downloaded this material from the Internet. I repainted the background and cropped it. Fire Image To create the fire material, create a rectangular face inside the fire place.

Here is a sample below. Create Face for Image Then I applied the fire material to the face. Apply Material to Face 5. But me I like the old way. I open my fire Diffuse map in Photoshop. Open Map in Photoshop b. Double click the Background Layer to make it Layer 0 c. Create new Layer and Fill it with white and place it under the Layer 0 your fire material Create new Layer and Fill d.

Use the Eyedropper Tool and select the black area in the actual image and adjust Fuzziness. Then click ok. Select Color Range e. Add Vector Mask Note: Invert g. This is cool of you are using a lot of 2D transparencies like plants, people etc. Refine Mask Edge h. Now right click on the Mask, click Add Mask to Selection. Once selected, create a new Layer and Fill the selection with black. Fill Selection with Black i. Now unhide Layer 0 and save your Transparency map. Save Transparency Map 5.

Note the areas highlighted in red. Settings Below is the render after using the Transparency maps. Render 1 Now I added some more planes, re-sized and rotated. Render 2 So here is the TV and fireplace together. Not the greatest combination though. Render 1.

Visit our sponsors:

Part 1 in this series can be found here. Nomer continues his great collection of lighting tutorials to help you get to grips with and simplify this often complex process, with some easy solutions to this often frustrating and confusing aspect to rendering. In this guide Nomer checks out Emissve materials to help light your SketchUp models. You will need a reasonable knowledge of SketchUp, rendering and the use of Photoshop for this tutorial. What is Emissive Material?

VIDEO: vray 2 for sketchup mac crack

Dome Light Vray 2 Sketchup | Sketchup tutorial. Day Scene V-Ray for SketchUp:: SketchUp 3D Rendering Tutorials by SketchUpArtists. More information. Im pretty familiar with both SU and vray. The company that i work for currently uses SU licenses and Vray I have been pushing to get. Overview. This guide is to serve as a reference for installation of V-Ray for SketchUp. Please refer to the “Glossary” section for specific terms used in this.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *